Science & Technology Orbit is where rockets launch, computers compute and whizbang flat-panel TVs give us the big picture on what's next. If you like the future, you'll like this orbit now.

Science & Technology Orbit:


 

NY Times Technology

Bits Blog: OpenSSL and Linux: A Tale of Two Open-Source Projects


For years, Linux has enjoyed the backing of a range of big tech companies. How has Linux flourished while other open-source efforts have begged for resources?






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Heartbleed Highlights a Contradiction in the Web


The bug that rattled the Internet last week exposed the paradox that some of the web’s most crucial coding depends on the efforts of volunteers.






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Michaels Stores’ Breach Involved 3 Million Customers


The company said that two security firms had found evidence of a breach at Michaels, a crafts retailer, and at a subsidiary, Aaron Brothers, a framing company.






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Bits Blog: Heartbleed Internet Security Flaw Used in Attack


On Friday, cybersecurity experts said they had evidence of the first confirmed attack on a major corporation using a bug in open source security technology.






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MSN Science & Technology

SpaceX making Easter delivery to space station

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — A SpaceX supply ship rocketed toward the International Space Station on Friday, setting the stage for an Easter morning delivery and urgent spacewalking repairs later in the week. Launch >>
 

Health care site flagged in Heartbleed review

WASHINGTON (AP) — People who have accounts on the enrollment website for President Barack Obama's signature health care law are being told to change their passwords following an administration-wide review of the government's vulnerability to the confounding Heartbleed computer virus. Launch >>
 

5 features an Amazon smartphone might offer

NEW YORK (AP) — Rumors of an Amazon smartphone reached a fever pitch this week, with several tech blogs speculating that the device could be due out this year. Launch >>
 

Quest for extraterrestrial life not over, say experts

PARIS, April 18, 2014 (AFP) - The discovery of an Earth-sized planet in the "habitable" zone of a distant star, though exciting, is still a long way from pointing to the existence of extraterrestrial life, experts said Friday. Launch >>
 

NASA's moon-orbiting robot crashes down as planned

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — NASA's robotic moon explorer, LADEE, is no more. Launch >>
 

White House updating online privacy policy

A new Obama administration privacy policy released Friday explains how the government will gather the user data of online visitors to WhiteHouse.gov, mobile apps and social media sites, and it clarifies that online comments, whether tirades or tributes, are in the open domain. Launch >>
 

Turning smog into jewels

A Dutch designer's solution to Beijing's pollution. Launch >>
 

Tiny power plants hold promise for nuclear energy

PARIS (AP) — Small underground nuclear power plants that could be cheaper to build than their behemoth counterparts may herald the future for an energy industry under intense scrutiny since the Fukushima disaster, the incoming head of the Nuclear Energy Agency told The Associated Press. Launch >>
 

Astronomers find most Earth-like planet yet

The discovery, announced on Thursday, is the closest scientists have come so far to finding a true Earth twin. The star, known as Kepler-186 and located about 500 light years away in Launch >>